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Linscheid Library

Transfer Students: Use

This guide will help you transition from your previous library to ECU's Linscheid Library

Using Your Sources

 

This page will help you use your sources effectively. Using your sources involves:

  • Double-checking that your sources fulfill the assignment requirements, 
  • Organizing your sources,
  • Incorporating the information in your sources into your project, and
  • Citing your sources properly.

Why Cite?

Have you ever wondered why it's so important to cite your sources? View this video tutorial to find out!

Why You Need to Cite Sources
Learn some of the reasons it is important to cite sources when writing a research paper.
text version | more info

Incorporating Sources

Using the sources you've found in your paper involves more than just copying and pasting quotations into your paper.

View this video tutorial to learn:

  • How to quote indirectly and directly,
  • How to paraphrase, and
  • How to introduce and analyze the works of others.

 

Incorporating Sources into Your Research Paper
Learn to effectively structure sources, include analysis and use sources to support an argument.
text versionmore info

Using MLA Style

The main book that you need to cite your sources and format your work in the Modern Language Association (MLA) Style is the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (7th ed.):

 

Find it behind the Reference Desk.

 

To get you started, here's the format for citing the most common types of resources in your MLA Style Works Cited Page:

 

BookBook

Author's Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. Publisher, Year of Publication. 

 

ArticlesArticle in a Scholarly Journal found in a Database

Author(s) Lastname, Firstname. "Title of Article." Title of Journal, Volume, Issue, Year, pages. Name of Database, DOI or URL. Date of access (day abbreviated month year).

 

web pageWeb Page

Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). "Title of Web Page." Name of Site, Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available), URL. Date of access (day abbreviated month year).

 

Don't forget that MLA Style uses author-page in-text citations!

 

Need more help with MLA Style? Check out the following resources.

Using APA Style

The main book that you need to cite your sources and format your work in the American Psychological Association (APA) style is the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.):

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association

Find it behind the Reference Desk. 

 

To get you started, here's the format for citing the most common types of resources in your APA Style Reference List:  

 

bookbookBook

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Location: Publisher.

 

ArticlesArticle from a Database

Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year). Title of article. Title of Periodical, volume number(issue number), page range. doi:0000000/000000000000 or http://dx.doi.org/10.0000/0000

 

web pageWeb Page

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Publication year, Month date). Title of webpage. Retrieved from URL
personal interview imagePersonal Interview

Personal interviews do not need to be included in the reference list, but they should be cited in your text. 

(Interviewee first initial. Last Name, personal communication, Month day, year)

(C. Smith, personal communication, January 11, 2017)

 

Don't forget that APA recommends author-date in-text citations!

 

Need more help with APA Style? Check out the following resources.

Using Chicago Style

The main book that will help you cite your sources and format your work in Chicago Style is The Chicago Manual of Style:

The Chicago Manual of Style 

Find it behind the Reference Desk.

 

To get you started, here's the format for citing the most common types of resources in your Chicago Style bibliography:

 

BookBook

Author's Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. Place of publication: Publisher, Year of publication.

 

ArticlesArticle in a Journal found in a Database

Author's Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Article.” Journal Title volume number, no. issue number (publication date): page number-page number. Accessed date. Doi: 0000000/000000000000 or http://dx.doi.org/10.0000/0000

web pageWeb Source

Author's Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Web Page.” Publishing Organization or Name of Web Site. Publication date and/or access date if available. URL.

 

Don't forget that you can use either the notes-bibliography system or the author-date system in Chicago Style!

 

Need more help with Chicago Style? Check out the following resources.

Need More Help?

These great websites provide a lot of examples and additional resources on multiple citation styles. 

Linscheid Library Citation Styles Guide
Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)

Get Organized

folderKeeping your research organized will save you a lot of time when you sit down to complete your project. There are many digital tools, like Zotero, Mendeley, and Evernote, that can help you organize your source materials.

However, the most important thing is to take clear and complete notes, whether with pen and paper or on a computer.

See this University of Toronto website for guidance on how to take effective research notes.